TWRA: Research underway to study, threatened species, pygmy rattlesnakes

A pygmy rattlesnake is shown at the Miami Science Museum, Tuesday, June 7, 2011 in Miami. The battle between humans and cold-blooded creatures will be the subject of "Swamp Wars," Animal Planet's series debuting at 9 p.m. EDT Sunday that will focus on Miami-Dade Fire Rescue's Venom Response Team. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)  

NASHVILLE, TN (WJHL) – the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency is assisting wildlife biologists at Tennessee State University in research to determine the distribution of pygmy rattlesnakes in Tennessee.

The pygmy rattlesnake is listed as a threatened species in Tennessee and the research will help in conservation efforts to preserve the species in the state. Native to Tennessee, pygmy rattlesnakes are predators that are rarely encountered and play important ecological roles, including the control of rodent populations. These tiny snakes will rattle their tails when threatened, but bites are extremely rare and non-fatal if treatment is administered. The snakes are seldom seen by humans.

To aid their research, the TSU wildlife biologists are asking that anyone who happens to encounter a pygmy rattlesnake, he/she is asked to document the location with a photograph with the Smartphone GPS location turned on.

(For an IPhone, it is located in Settings/Privacy. Other phones or cameras will have similar settings.)

This will provide GPS coordinates of the photo to document the exact location.

Previous pygmy rattlesnake sightings, along with photographs, can also be reported with specific location data and the date of the sighting. Persons are reminded not to harass or attempt to capture the snakes. The TWRA does not want anyone to endanger themselves.

Pygmy rattlesnake sightings and information may be reported to one of the following biologists: Shawn Snyder, Email: ssnyder1@my.tnstate.edu or (717) 683-4226; Dr. Bill Sutton, Email: wsutton@tnstate.edu or (615) 963-7787.

Funding for the project is being provided by the TWRA through state and tribal wildlife grants.

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